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Healthy mind can be found only in a healthy body. In a weak body there cannot be a healthy and active mind. And for a healthy body physical exercise is a must. Without physical exercise, our body will grow weak, lethargic and dull. The aim of education is the all round development of a personality. It cannot afford to neglect the physical aspect of a student. Development of mind and body are equally important in any good education.

Want of proper physical exercise in the form of games and sports develops many mental problems. Mere intellectual attainment is not enough. Good health and sound body are also a must to face the challenges of life. Therefore, games and sports are an integral part of school education. Education will remain incomplete without physical training and exercise. “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy” is a famous saying. After studies some kid of physical exercise, games and sports are necessary. The refresh body and mind and provide recreation. A game of football or vallyball in the open air is very refreshing. A game of hockey or a match of badminton will help a student regain his lost mental and physical energy. There will be greater intake of oxygen, better blood circulation and digestion because of these. In the open, where games are played there is fresh air, openness and presence of nature. They have a very healthy influence on the players. Running, Jumping, kicking, swimming etc. provide vigorous exercise to our limbs and organs of the body. They provide us physical fitness, courage endurance, cooperation and team spirit. The players are more disciplined and fit than others. Sports and games along with education prepare us to stand up and face the challenges of life.

Games and sports are a valuable form of education. They develop our skills and abilities to the maximum. They teach discipline, obedience and cooperation. Every game has it own rules and regulations. They are binding on the players. All players have to follow them. There is penalty on their violation. One can never win a match without following the laws of the game. He has to abide by the judgement of the refree. It teaches a player how important are laws. It makes clear how important it is to follow the rules and regulations games and sports help us in producing very disciplined citizens, leaders and professionals. They teach how to cooperate with one another and achieve success. It is a playground or gymnasium where team spirit, cooperation and endurance can be taught best, games teach players how to ignore individual interests for the sake of greater interests of the team and society. This teaching of sacrifice is of great social and national interest. Games also teach fair play and faith in equality and justice. They enable us to take defeat and victory in a cheerful spirit.

Games also allow an outlet to our suppressed energy. It helps us a lot in remaining peaceful and non-violent. When our energy is suppressed we become irritative, short-tempered, violent hooliganism and acts of lawlessness. Games also provide us the best use of leisure time.

Famous players and sports persons bring credit for themselves and the country. They are famous and popular and work as country’s cultural ambassadors. They strengthen international relations. They also develop and promote patriotism and national integration. But games are a means and not an end in themselves. They should not be practiced at the cost of studies. Excess of everything is bad. They should be played and enjoyed only in spare time. They are real boon and blessing if done properly and wisely.

India needs good and great players and sports persons. They are in great demand to participate in national and international events. India’s record in this respect has been very poor. The boys and girls should be caught at the very young age and trained in different games and sports. There should be no school without a proper playground attached to it. Mere mental education is of no use without physical education. They should go hand-in-hand as integral parts of an education. They are complementary to each other.

You might be one of those people that perform very well when it comes to sports. If you are and you are in high school, you might have the idea that your ability at a given sport could end up putting you in line for a sports scholarship that will either entirely pay for college, or at least partially pay for your higher education. However, there is more to getting a scholarship than just being good at sports.

One thing you have to understand is that with sports scholarship there are a few ways to get them. For some, especially in the more high profile sports like football and basketball, you have a good chance at being recruited; however, not all scholarships that are sports related come from athletes being recruited.

In many cases, if you are looking for a sports scholarship, for whatever sport you happen to play, you might just have to ask. With so many high school athletes, it is conceivable that your talents at a given sport are heads and shoulders above most people; but there is still the possibility you will be overlooked. There are too many athletes and only a small number of coaches and recruits, comparatively speaking.

Sometimes you will have to contact a coach yourself, offer them up your statistics, not only on the field of play but your grades as well. In essences, you are going to have to recruit them, much like a college coach might recruit a person of superior talent.

Consider this, in most scholarship situations, a person has to ask for one rather than them being solicited for a scholarship. In fact, the way scholarships are offered to potential students are less normal and less common than the traditional way of getting a scholarship, which is to request one.

Another to remember is that you will have to be persistent as well. You will have to be aware that you might hear no a lot. However, if you have the skills and you have the talent, and of course you’ll need the grades as well, you will eventually find a sports scholarship that fits your needs.

The fact is that there are plenty of sports scholarship to go around. Some might be full scholarships, others might be partial scholarships, and it is wise to not get too far ahead of yourself and only look for full scholarships as the only option. While they do exist, they are not easy to get and when it comes to paying for college these days, any help paying for it is welcome, or at least it should be.

Sports are a very popular interest worldwide as there are many varieties people can choose from to indulge themselves in. Some people are interested in football while others like basketball. Some love the water and prefer swimming, while others like to speed inside a racing car. It doesn’t matter what type of sport you like to play as long as you realize the importance of the equipment and apparel required to play these sports. For playing football you need a football and two goal posts. Individually you may need a good pair of shoes and something to keep sweat off your eyes as it drips from your forehead. It is not so easy to indulge in any sports activity if you don’t have the appropriate sports equipment. The better your sports equipment is, the better will be your game.

The first step to have a good sporting experience is to buy a equipment that is of good quality in terms of its strength and is light in weight. For instance, if the racket with which you play badminton is not of appropriate weight your hand may not respond in the ideal fashion while playing the game. You might have to risk losing your game. But if you hold the racket before making a purchase and gauge as to what weight and length suits your hand the most, you will be able to take a good decision. Your decision at this point in time will go a long way to support your actual game.

In a game such as football, the goal keeper, for instance, would need equipment such as a helmet, shoulder pads and knee pads. You also need to think of the quality here too! For his own sake the goal keeper needs to get a hair cut before the game. The helmet should be fitting the goal keeper properly. The helmet should be refitted if the hair style of the goal keeper has changed. The front portion of the helmet should just protect the head and not become a hindrance by covering the forehead including the eyebrows. The ear holes also should match up with player’s ears. Move the helmet while the goal keeper is wearing it so that any displacement of the helmet can be rectified before the game starts.

Mouth guards are also considered another sporting equipment that should be checked for cleaning and fitting. They should be boiled to refit on the mouth of the player. Shoulder pads allow the goal keeper adequate amount of mobility. The back and front of the shoulder pads should be able to cover the shoulder blades and pectorals respectively.

Athletes should try and wear T-shirts that prevent occurrence of rashes and skin irritations arising from rough straps. Most sports equipments are of protective kind. The primary and the protective equipment are equally important because as the game progresses players become quite aggressive in an attempt to win the game. If these sports equipment are not maintained the players are bound to injure themselves.

Conditioning is a word that is used a lot in the fitness industry but what does it really mean to have conditioning? There are those that are ripped from strength conditioning, marathon runners have to go through a type of stamina conditioning and then there is the conditioning that is necessary for fighters and martial artists.

Conditioning can come off as this hard core concept of hard work and training to build your body up so it can perform or endure what the sport demands of it.

And it’s true.

However, that is not the whole picture of what it means to be a conditioned athlete. Building your body and it’s performance potentials is only the outcome associated to having “great conditioning”.

The other half of the definition of conditioning is more about the discipline, the standard and the values that you adopt.

“Great conditioning” is the result of adopting and integrating habits, standards and values that slowly, over time changes and transforms the conditions of the body.

Conditioning isn’t so much about building yourself up but rather more about adopting a specific way of being that will serve you in the long run which is beneficial for the performance and execution of the skills in a given sport or physical activity.

So, how do you integrate a great conditioning ritual? One that will meet your athletic needs based on the sport or physical activity of your choice?

A good place to start is by looking at where your values are placed in your sport. By looking at the components that you already have a natural inclination to favour and value, then you have a platform where you can design for yourself a discipline that you are more than likely to commit to.

If for example you naturally favour cardio, then use that as a base to develop a discipline to condition, not only great cardio but also as a way to condition better form, more strength and greater endurance doing the activity that is the source of cardio. It’s also a great way to develop secondary attributes. If, for instance you typically rely on jogging for cardio but you would like to develop another physical skill or work on some upper body, than you might consider cardio boxing. Or you might want to develop better foot co-ordination and do some skip rope.

By focusing on what you already prefer, you are much more likely to build on it and develop a discipline and from a place of discipline is where conditioning can flow from the best.

Also, using discipline is a powerful way to predispose yourself to growth and improvement in a specific skill or attribute. Once you have established a discipline on a particular practice, then it’s only a matter of pushing yourself and upping the ante in order to improve and refine that conditioning.

Let me leave with one final thought, and that is, when thinking in terms of the type of conditioning you feel you may need for whatever fitness goal that you have, think about what habits you need to adopt and how you need to be in the process of the training rather than what you need to do to reach and achieve a goal to finally arrive at. Chances are that when you arrive at that goal, in order to maintain it, you will need to sustain the conditioning by maintaining the practice that got you there in the first place.

Conditioning is a process.

The starlit galaxies of the observable Universe were born very long ago, and began to cast their brilliant, beautiful, starlit fires into Space less than a billion years after the Big Bang birth of the Universe almost 14 billion years ago. Our own large barred-spiral Galaxy, the Milky Way, is a very ancient structure that houses our Solar System, which is located about 27,000 light-years from the Galactic Center, on the inner edge of one of the spiral-shaped concentrations of gas and dust called the Orion Arm. The stars that dwell in the innermost 10,000 light-years of our Galaxy create a bulge and one or more bars that radiate out from the bulge – where there lies in wait, at the very heart of our Galaxy, an intense radio source, named Sagittarius A * , or Sgr A * (pronounced saj-a-star) , for short. Sgr A * is thought to be a supermassive black hole that weighs-in at millions of times the mass of our Sun. In November 2016, a team of astronomers announced the happy news that they have discovered a new family of stars living in our Milky Way's heart. This new family of stellar sparklers are a welcome addition to our neighborhood because they can shed new light on our Galaxy's birth in the primordial Universe.

This new discovery can solve some of the haunting mysteries surrounding globular clusters – which are spherical concentrations of about a million stars that formed at the very beginning of our Galaxy's existence. Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) researcher, Dr. Ricardo Schiavon, led the project responsible for discovering the tattle-tale family of stars. LJMU , in Liverpool, England, is a member of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) – a international collaboration of scientists at numerous institutions. One of the projects of this collaboration is the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) which gathers infrared data on literally hundreds of thousands of stars dwelling in our Milky Way Galaxy.

By observing stars in the infrared towards the Galactic Center , the team of astronomers were able to discover the new family of stars – the likes of which had previously been observed only within globular clusters.

Globular clusters are beautiful spherical collections of stars that orbit around the core of a galaxy, and are very tightly glued together by their own gravity – which is why they have spherical shapes and reliably high stellar densities towards their centers. These lovely collections of stars are usually found in the halo of a galaxy, and they harbor considerably more stars – and are also much older – than open clusters , which are less likely than their globular cousins. Open clusters are also usually seen in a galaxy's disk , rather than in the halo.

There are approximately 150 to 158 globulars known to inhabit our Galaxy, and they are considered to be fairly common objects. In addition, there are about 10 to 20 more still undiscovered globular clusters within our Milky Way. These globulars orbit our Galaxy at radii of about 130,000 light-years– or more! Galaxies that are larger than our Milky Way can also play host to more globulars. For example, the slightly larger neighboring spiral, the Andromeda Galaxy , may host as many as 500 of these clusters. Some of the giant elliptical (football-shaped) galaxies – especially those that are located at the centers of galaxy clusters, such as M87 –can host as many as 13,000 globular clusters.

Our Galaxy is a denizen of the Local Group . Every galaxy of sufficient mass housing in the Local Group has an associated collection of globular clusters. The Sagittarius Dwarf galaxy, and the controversial Canis Dwarf galaxy, have both been observed to be in the mid of contributing their associated globulars –such as Palomar 12 – to the Milky Way. This sheds light on how many of our Galaxy's globulars might have snatched up in the past.

Globulars contain some of the first stars to be born in a galaxy like ours. Neverheless, how these clusters were born, and the role they once played in galactic evolution, are not well understood. After all this, it is generally thought that globular clusters formed in concert with the star-birthing process that occurred within their primordial parent galaxies – rather than as separate and distinct galaxies in their own right. Also, in many globular clusters , most of the constituent stars appear to be at the same stage of stellar evolution. This observation suggests that they were all born about the same time. However, the star-birth history varies from cluster to cluster, with some clusters showing distinct populations of stars.

Milky Way Matters

A sparkling host of brilliant stars hurl their fabulous light out into Space from where they dwell within the more than 100 billion galaxies of the observable Universe. The observable universe is that relatively small portion of the unimaginably vast cosmos that we are able to observe – most of the Universe exists far beyond what we can see. This is because the light streaming towards us from those mysterious and remote regions has not had enough time to reach us since the Big Bang. The starry galaxies of our observable universe trace out for us awful, and invisible invisible, heavy filaments composed of transparent dark matter . The identity of the dark matter is not known, but many astronomers strongly suspect that it is composed of exotic, non-atomic particles that can not interact with light, or any other form of electromagnetic radiation, which is why it is invisible. The starlit galaxies that mingle together to form groups and clusters of galaxies light up the transparent filaments that compose what is called the Cosmic Web. In this way, the stellar constituents of galaxies outline, with the bright light of publicity, that which we would otherwise not suspect is there.

The most widely accepted theory of galactic formation and evolution is frequently referred to as the bottom up model. The bottom up model suggests that large and majestic galaxies – like our own Milky Way – were rare in the early Universe, and that galaxies only gradually attained these impressive sizes as a result of collisions and mice between much smaller, amorphous protogalactic blobs. It is generally thought that the most ancient galaxies were only about one-tenth the size of our own Galaxy, but as a result of their rapid production of fiery new and dazzling baby stars, they were just as brilliant. These relatively small, but extremely bright, very ancient galaxies served as the "seeds" from which the large galaxies inhabiting the Universe today grow and flourished.

In the primordial Universe, opaque clouds of mostly hydrogen gas lumped into one another and then coalesced along the massive, enormous filaments of the invisible Cosmic Web –composed of the ghostly dark matter. Even though scientists have not as yet identified what the dark matter really is, they have a good idea of ​​what it probably is not. Dark matter is most likely not made up of the "ordinary" atomic matter that composes all of the familiar elements listed in the Periodic Table– the so-called "ordinary" stuff of stars, planets, moons, oceans, sand, trees, and people. "Ordinary" atomic matter is really very exceptional – even though it only accounts for about 5% of the mass-energy of the Universe. Atomic matter is what brought life into the Universe. We are such stuff as stars are made of. The stars created literally all of the atomic elements heavier than helium, that made life possible, in their nuclear-fusing hearts. In this way, the stars progressively created heavier and heaver atomic elements out of lighter ones. The iron in our blood, the calcium in our bones, the oxygen we breathe, and the carbon that is the basis for life on Earth – the dirt, stone, and sand beneath our feet – were all manufactured in the searing-hot nuclear-fusing furnaces of the stars or alternatively, in the explosive supernova demise of the more massive stellar denizens of the Cosmos.

Our Galaxy's oldest stars have been estimated to be 13.6 billion years old. This would suggest that the Milky Way is almost as old as the Universe itself, which is about 13.8 billion years old. Stars and gases at a wide range of distances from the Galactic Center of our Milky Way all orbit at about 220 kilometers per second. This constant speed of rotation conflicts with the laws of Keplerian dynamics and hints that much of our Milky Way's mass does not emit or absorb electromagnetic radiation – an indication of the existence of dark matter.

In the primeval Universe, little by little, the wandering clouds of primordial gases and the invisible, ghostly dark matter did their fantastic dance together, combining to create the familiar structures in Space that astronomers observe today. Dense collections of the dark matter came to fill the entire ancient Cosmos, thus becoming the "seeds" from which the galaxies formed and evolved through Time. The powerful gravitational tugs of those ancient protogalactic "seeds" squeezed the primeval gases into ever tighter and tighter clouds. The clouds intermingled in a mysterious ancient dance, colliding and merging with one another to create these very ancient galactic building blocks. The primordial building blocks formed when halos of dark matter collapsed under the powerful and heavy weight of their own gravity. The protogalaxies did their ancient waltz together, ever forming ever larger structures that became immense, majestic, starlit galaxies like our own Milky Way. The very ancient Universe was much smaller than it is today because of the accelerating expansion of Spacetime. The protogalaxies were reliably close to one another and, as a result, frequently bumped into one another and merged. This is how galaxies like our Milky Way were born.

From Earth the Milky Way can be seen as a fuzzy band of soft white light about 30 degrees wide, creating an amazing arc across the sky. The light emanating from this band originates from the accumulated light of unresolved stars and other material located in the direction of the Galactic Plane . Darker segments of the band, such as two areas named the Great Rift and the Coalsack , are really regions where light from distant stars is blocked out by shrouds of obscuring dust swirling around in the space between stars. The area of ​​the sky blocked by our Milky Way is called the Zone of Avoidance. Our Galaxy is the second-largest inhabitant of the Local Group , after the spiral Andromeda Galaxy .

Our Milky Way plays host to between 200 and 400 billion stars, and at least 100 billion planets. By comparison, the Andromeda Galaxy is thought to harbor approximately one trillion stellar inmates. However, most of the mass of our Milky Way appears to be composed of the dark matter , which interactions with "ordinary" atomic matter only through the force of gravity. A dark matter halo is spread out reliably uniformly to a distance beyond one hundred kiloparsecs from the Galactic Center.

The disk of stars in our Galaxy does not display a sharp edge beyond that there are no stars. Instead, the concentration of stars decreases with distance from the center of our Milky Way. Surrounding the Galactic Disk is the spherical dark matter halo, containing stars and globular clusters, that extends outward. However, the halo is limited in size by the orbits of a duo of amorphous Milky Way satellite galaxies, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. The Magellanic Clouds make their closest approach to the Galactic Center at approximately 180,000 light-years.

Welcoming A New Family Of Stars Into Our Galaxy's Heart

The lovely new family of bewitching stars possibly once belonged to globular clusters that were destroyed during the violent beginning of the formation of the Galactic Center. In this case, there would have once been approximately 10 times more globular clusters in our Milky Way, during its formative early years, than there are today. This means that a large percentage of the elderly stars, now dwelling within the inner portions of our Galaxy, may have been born in globular clusters that were historically destroyed.

"This is a very exciting finding that helps us address fascinating questions such as what is the nature of the stars in the inner regions of the Milky Way, how globular clusters formed and what role they played in the formation of the early Milky Way– and by extension the formation of other galaxies. The center of the Milky Way is poorly understood, because it is blocked from view by intervening dust. the Galaxy better than other teams, "explained Dr. Ricardo Schiavon in the November 21, 2016 LJMU Press Release.

Dr. Schiavon continued to note: "From our observations we could determine the chemical compositions of thousands of stars, which we spotted a significant number of stars that differed from the bulk of the stars in the inner regions of the Galaxy, due to their very high While not certain, we suspect that these stars caused from globular cluster destruction. They could also be the byproducts of the first episodes of star formation taking place at the beginning of the Galaxy's history. hypotheses. "

When T.L. Weaver sold a piece of scrub land to local businessmen in 1925, he had no idea that he’d be getting into the greyhound racing business. When the businessmen couldn’t pay their mortgage, he got the land back, but now it had a dog track on it: Derby Lane, the oldest track in the US. The Weaver family is still running it and it’s going strong.

With ponds and greenery surrounding it, Derby Lane is where I sometimes have trouble keeping my mind on the races, because I get distracted watching the wildlife. However, the racing is well worth watching, because they have some of – if not the best – dogs in the country.

This is the track where the legendary Keefer won the first 4 stakes races of the 1986 season in front of 12,779 fans.

It’s also the track where business was so slow in the early years that Weaver staged all kinds of other sporting events including an exhibition football game with the also-legendary Jim Thorpe. He even tried auto races! It wasn’t long though, as greyhound racing gained in popularity, before people like Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig were coming to watch the dogs run.

Admission is free and kids are admitted with adult supervision. There’s a good restaurant, a couple of lounges and a sports bar. Lots of large-screen TVs make it easy to watch the races or replays. Of course, it’s air conditioned, but you can sit out on the terrace during the cooler months if you like. I really enjoy sitting there and going over my program or writing postcards to my New England friends who are freezing their patoots off.

Don’t miss Vera’s News a really nice blog authored by Vera Filipelli, who has been involved with greyhound racing for thirty years in several states including WV, WI and now Florida. Not only does Vera write, but she’s also participated in film and video projects, contributed to the National Greyhound Review and co-hosted major events in the greyhound world. Her blog will let you know what’s happening at Derby Lane.

Peake’s Picks from the longtime “Voice of Derby Lane” can clue you in on some longshot winners also. There’s a link on the Derby Lane site. Peake also takes a look at likely horses from Wednesday through Saturday, starting around noon.

Derby Lane truly is a cut above the rest when it comes to Florida Greyhound tracks.

One of the most popular games in the UK and Australia is the Cricket, or what is so-called “The Gentleman’s Game” which can be traced back down to Tudor times. The first game was officially played in the 1600s by the royal families.

There are written evidences to prove that even the kings and princes were able to play this game which has become so popular nowadays.

What people can immediately see about it is that it is a bat-and-ball game and that two teams try to outdo each other in a match. However, only a few have known that there are ten different types of this game. And they are as follow…

1. County – it comprises of many first class matches which are played by different counties in England. There is, however, one county which is barred from playing this type, Glamorgan, located in Welsh county.

2. Twenty20 – it was first introduced in the UK in 2003 for domestic matches. However, T20 Cricket’s popularity grew and reached other countries that are also playing the cricket game.

3. Test – it is the longest type of cricket that would reach up to five days. But it is also the most reliable to measure how a team is made of.

4. Car – it is most popular in Britain where in the match is played while driving down the road in a car. The rules can be complicated because of its unusual equipment, the cars.

5. One Day – it is yet another good alternative for four-day or five-day cricket. It uses white cricket balls and colored uniforms which add to the excitement of the spectators.

6. First Class – it is the oldest type of cricket which has been practiced long since the introduction of Test cricket. Moreover, it is usually played by the teams within the country. Most often, First Class Cricket is played during domestic matches.

7. List A – the International Cricket Council introduced this new type in 2006. It serves almost the same purpose as with the First Class Cricket.

8. Indoor – the first game of this type of cricket was played indoor in Perth, Australia in 1970s. Slowly, it has gained popularity and is now recognized to be a better alternative of the traditional outdoor game.

9. Kwik – for the countries that recognize cricket as a great sport, Kwik Cricket is considerably popular. This one’s for children to train them for future professional cricket game. Children use plastic bats and balls to avoid injuries.

10. Club Cricket– it is usually played by the amateurs wherein all the rules and laws of cricket are applied to their full extent to practice non-professional players. This is to prepare them into the world of professional cricket.

Are you searching for soccer body painting ideas and a painted football costume? If you have already searched to find a great body design, you may have noticed how many different photo galleries are available out there – both for male and female soccer costume ideas.

So whether you would like to take a look at the best body design ideas simply as a hobby in your spare time, or perhaps you would like to draw a creative soccer art on your body, you will find out some helpful ideas here in this free guide.

Why Body Painting is the New Trend as a Football Cheerleading Outfit?

For decades, it has been a motivational custom to support our favorite team by various means – from cheerleading dances, songs, waving the soccer team flag, or simply shouting supportive messages to them during the game.

So now in the 21st century, where young people are more innovative than ever, a new trend is setting into place: Soccer body painting.

You have already seen the typical old way of wearing the football team costume, when the football fans would like to support their team – especially in big important matches.

Now this new way of wearing a body or face painting art, adds a kick to it. Because it is more creative, more bold, and stands out from the rest of the crowd.

Now depending on how comfortable you are with the idea, you may paint on your skin with no clothes on. Or to dress more modestly, you can wear a white simple underwear and paint on top of it, so it almost looks like it is a part of your own skin.

Female and Male Body Art Ideas for Men and Women

When it comes to clothes, tattoo, and body and face paints, there are usually slightly different styles suitable for men, women, or children. So it is a wise idea to check out different designs based on your age and gender, to find the style that matches you the best.

For younger kids or teenagers, body arts are usually a fun way to celebrate a birthday, or as a part of a costume party. But for adult men and women, body painting is more like an art. A way to express a bold unique side of them through the body.

That is the reason female body paint styles are usually designed to appear more attractive, feminine, and focus on the unique curves of the body. To put it simply, body art designs for women are usually more sexy.

On the other hand, male body styles are focused on delivering a character message – like strength, power, or simply a good sense of humor. Superhero designs are common for men especially (e.g. Batman, Spiderman, Superman, etc.)

So hopefully the above mentioned tips helps you find your favorite body and face painting design more easily.

We checked up on the bachelor the next week on the course, and here is what he found:

With the Hoover VHD862-80 Washing Machine the advanced Auto Load will adjust the cycle according to the type of laundry and the weight of the laundry that is placed in the drum. The washing and spinning functions of the washer were excellent and very energy efficient because it was all done according to the size and weight of the laundry along with the fabric specifications that could also be programmed into it. His expensive dress shirts were actually coming out of the spin dry function without wrinkles and little air drying time in order to be ready to wear. He was no longer sending shirts to the cleaners, but doing them himself.

Because he plays soccer, he has uniforms that are really stained and the Stain Blaster works flawlessly with the cotton cycle. This cycle sustains a constant temperature all the way through the wash cycle. Following the spin cycle, the dry load has less than forty percent moisture content, perfect for a short time to air dry or spend a few minutes in the dryer.

Knowing exactly what you need, how much room you have for the appliance, and the features you need the appliance to have will give you a base to start searching for the perfect washer for your needs. Take a good look at the Hoover VHD862-80 Washing Machine because this washer is in the mid range price level and has a lot of features that the more expensive models on the market have. The five year parts, service and repair coverage ensures that the appliance will function very well and if it does not, it can be taken care of right away by a certified repair service.

Laundry will never look so good when you buy a new Hoover VHD862-80 Washing Machine. The best way to learn all you need to know about washing machine home appliances is to check out a few online and compare functionality with price on several models so that you can get an idea of what to expect. A new machine can make a huge difference in the speed of your laundry and the total on your utility bills.

Dedicated to my mother for devoting her love and time to homeschooling my three siblings and me. Your patience and love is without bounds.

Homeschooling with Ultimate Freedom

Homeschoolers have freedom without parallel. To mimic a public or private school curriculum is a waste of this freedom. This guide takes advantage of our freedom and outlines the exact academic curriculum for a homeschool student to get accepted into medical school. It tells the key to reading at age three, achieving near perfect SAT scores, taking college classes at age fourteen and acquiring acceptance letters to Ivy League colleges. Believe it or not, this is not that difficult. It does not require studying eight hours a day. It requires less. I had much more free time than my public school friends. My three younger siblings also had more free time. I am now a medical student at Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons. My siblings and I all read at age three, scored in the top percentiles on the SAT and received near perfect grades in college. We were all students of the same homeschool curriculum and strategy. This guide contains the key strategies, curricula and timelines for any homeschool student to achieve academic superiority.

Below is the most basic timeline of your student’s major academic achievements. Although I begin at age three, a student can hop on board at any age. The same overall strategy applies-just the timeline will probably be different.

Age (yrs) Milestone

3 Reading

9 Algebra

14 Enroll in college classes

15 Score above 98th percentile on SAT I; Score above 700 on SAT IIs; Calculus

16 – 17 Acceptance to “Most Competitive” College

22 Acceptance to Ivy League medical school (if you want)

Insight #1: “Give Your Child a Superior Mind”

This is the title of a book by the author Siegfried Engelmann. Get it. The book is no longer in print, but used copies can be found on Amazon.com. It is a real gem with timeless teachings. Use this book as a guide to begin educating your child at age three.

To teach your child how to read, use the book Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons. Your child will be reading before his or her fourth birthday.

Bottom Line: Beginning at age three, teach the following books to your young prodigy.

Title: Give Your Child a Superior Mind

Authors: Siegfried and Therese Engelmann

Pub Date: 1981

Title: Teach your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons

Authors: Siegfried Engelmann, Phyllis Haddox, Elaine Bruner

Pub Date: 1986

Insight #2: Reading and Arithmetic (that’s it)

Reading and arithmetic should consume 80% of your student’s education from age three to thirteen. Wait! But what about history, political science, biology, chemistry and the other subjects? Surely these subjects MUST be important because they make up most of a public or private school curriculum. Wrong! Not to say that these subjects are unimportant, but, rather, a student with a strong reading comprehension and math background can learn them very quickly. In other words, it is very easy to “catch up” in these subjects.

Strong reading comprehension = 3.91 college GPA in history, philosophy and literature

I enrolled at Providence College with almost no history background. I knew some details about the Revolutionary War, Civil War and World Wars, but that was about it. One of the cornerstone courses at Providence College is the Development of Western Civilization (“Civ”). It is a five-credit course that is taken every semester during freshman and sophomore year. The course covers history, philosophy, literature and religion from the Ancient Greeks to the fall of the Berlin Wall. With virtually no background in Civ, I finished the Honors course series with all A’s. I am not bragging and am not gifted. It just turns out that studying these “fluff” subjects all throughout childhood is a waste of time. Of course, if your student finds these subjects interesting, then encourage further study! Especially, since it still involves reading. My youngest brother loves reading history and would spend hours reading the encyclopedia. However, it was crucial that this passion did not detract from his math studies. It didn’t and he scored in the 99th percentile on the SAT I.

Strong math background = 4.00 college GPA in physics, chemistry and calculus

Just as reading is key for success in the fluff subjects, math is essential for success in chemistry, physics and, well, more math. I have seen hundreds of pre-med students get poor grades in chemistry, physics and calculus because of bad math backgrounds. Math is the backbone of these problem-solving subjects.

While a strong reader can stroll into her first college history class with almost no background knowledge and ace the course, she probably could NOT do the same in the pre-medical courses. Stay with me though, because she will catch up and be a superstar in the sciences by age sixteen (this will be addressed in Part II, Insight #8). With this strategy, I graduated from Providence College with a 4.0 GPA in the pre-medical sciences. Similarly, all of my siblings have won awards for consistently stellar performances in the sciences.

Bottom Line: From age three to thirteen, 80% of your student’s education should be focused on reading and math. The remaining 20% can be spent studying other subjects with a bias toward the sciences.

Insight #3: Math… Math… and more Math

I cannot stress enough the importance of a strong math background. The following books are what I used for my math education and are highly recommended. The Saxon math books are very challenging and repetitive. This is a bear to many students, but it engrains a math foundation surpassed by few. Below is a timeline of what math books to use at different ages:

Age (yrs) Math Level Book Series, Author

4-8 Math Workbooks 1 – 16 Developmental Math Workbooks, George Saad, PhD

8 Math 76 Saxon Publishers, John Saxon

9 Algebra ½

10 – 11 Algebra 1

12 Algebra 2

13 – 14 Advanced Mathematics

15 – 16 Calculus

Developmental Math Workbooks: Completion of these books will require active participation of the homeschooling parent. They are merely workbooks, so you must teach the student how to perform the basic math functions (i.e. adding, division, fractions, decimals).

Saxon Math books: Each lesson in the Saxon Math books teaches the math function that is applied in the respective problem set. With the exception of Math 76 (which should be studied at an accelerated pace), the student should complete at least one lesson a day. As the student progresses through Algebra ½, she should require less and less of the homeschooling parent’s time. By the time the student completes Algebra ½, she should be learning most of the lessons herself with only occasional help.

Bottom Line: Math is probably the most important subject in the student’s education and should be the primary focus every school day.

Insight #4: Reading (lots of it)

A strong reading background is just as important as a strong math background. The books that I previously mentioned in Insight #1 by the author Siegfried Engelmann are highly recommended by my parents. However, my parents believe that the reading program that we used subsequently was not very good. The program we used from ages five to eight years old was Total Reading. Although this program worked okay for us, I am not going to fully endorse it as I do the other books/programs. I recommend doing some online research and finding a reading program that is better.

When the student is about ten years old, I recommend starting the book series Vocabulary from Classical Roots, by Nancy and Norma Fifer. This program teaches vocabulary by focusing on the Latin and Greek roots common to many words. It is key to know these roots for the SAT I verbal section. The SAT I verbal section includes an enormous variety of obscure and difficult words. To memorize the dictionary in order to do well in this section of the SAT I is unnecessary (and not worth your time). When I took the SAT, vocabulary was tested in sentence completions and analogies. Out of about forty vocabulary questions on the SAT, I only got one wrong. The SAT does not require the student to know the exact definition of each word; rather, he only needs to have a basic understanding of each word’s meaning. Vocabulary from Classical Roots gave me the ability to deduce the meanings of words that I had never seen before and, in turn, do well on the SAT verbal section.

In addition to the above reading curricula, the student should continually read, read, read. Reading difficult material will be immensely helpful for improving his reading comprehension. Throughout my youth, I read many classical books (i.e. Odyssey, War and Peace, Treasure Island).

Bottom Line: Your student should read as much as possible (both leisurely and as part of a program). Total Reading is the reading program that my family used from ages five to eight; however, I recommend researching another reading program that will give even better results. At around age ten, the student should begin learning vocabulary from Vocabulary from Classical Roots. Below is the info on the aforementioned books.

Title: Total Reading

Author: Total Reading, Inc.

Pub. Date: New editions available

Title: Vocabulary from Classical Roots

Author: Nancy Fifer and Norma Fifer

Pub. Date: 1998

Insight #5: A strong reader can quickly become a great writer

Until I took a college writing class at age sixteen, I had never written a paper longer than two double spaced pages. My first writing composition class was a freshman writing seminar at Kalamazoo College. I received an A- in the class, but it was probably the most challenging college class I ever took. In addition to my reading program, one of the only other parts of my homeschool curriculum that I would recommend changing is the writing component. There is no need for your student to write papers every day, but he probably should have written at least a dozen research papers before college. So, he should start writing papers periodically at age fourteen and will then easily obtain A’s in college writing classes. By the time I was a sophomore at Providence College, my research, creative writing and philosophy papers were used as examples in the class. My siblings all received A’s in their college writing classes as well.

While writing becomes a large part of the student’s curriculum at age fourteen, the mechanics of writing (i.e. grammar) should be learned before then. Starting at age eleven, I used the Easy Grammar 56 Workbook to learn advanced grammar. At age twelve, I began studying the next book in the series, Easy Grammar Plus Workbook.

Bottom Line: A strong reader has the potential to be a great writer. The student should start writing papers on a regular basis at age fourteen. To learn the mechanics of writing, he should study the following workbooks starting at age eleven and finishing by age fourteen.

Title: Easy Grammar Workbook 56

Author: Wanda Phillips

Pub. Date: 1994

Title: Easy Grammar Plus Workbook

Author: Wanda Phillips

Pub. Date: 2007

Insight #6: Age fourteen: Major curricula change

If you paid attention to the ages in the previous insights, it would seem that there is a ton of “catching up” to do beginning at age fourteen. It may seem like your student doesn’t have enough hours in a day to do it all. This is not true. Between ages thirteen and fourteen, the student’s homeschool curriculum changes drastically. For example, no longer is math the primary focus. Actually, only about 10% of the student’s time should be spent on Saxon math. By age thirteen, the student should already have a math background that will guarantee a near perfect math SAT score and easy A’s in college calculus. So, the majority of time that was previously spent on math will now be used for SAT preparation. Similarly, the time previously spent reading will now be converted to the study of chemistry. Finally, the amount of writing will more than double at this age. Below is an approximate schedule showing this curricula re-focus.

Age (yrs) Subject Study Time Allotment (%)

3-13 Math 40

Reading 40

Physical and natural sciences 10

Writing 5

History, geography, etc. 5

14 Math (Saxon) 10

Reading Comprehension 10

Chemistry 35

Writing 15

SAT Prep 30

Bottom Line: The intensity of your student’s study will increase a little bit at age fourteen. However, your student’s new studies (i.e. SAT prep, college chemistry, writing) should all come easy with his superior math and reading skills.

Insight #7: SAT, 99th percentile at age fifteen

So your homeschool student is now fourteen years old and will be applying to college in a couple of years. Public and private school students will go to their counselor’s office and request a copy of their official high school transcripts mailed to Harvard, MIT, etc. They will have the school seal on the envelope and counselor’s signature on the transcript. On the other hand, you will go to your word processor program on the family computer, write what you think resembles a high school transcript and then sign it as the student’s counselor. No doubt, Harvard might weigh your student’s 4.0 GPA transcript a bit differently than his private or public school peers. So, acing the SAT is probably the biggest step toward validating your student’s home education. I challenge any admissions committee member to look at your student’s 2200 (~99th percentile) score on the SAT I and say that his home education was inferior. On the other hand, if you submit his 4.0 GPA transcripts alongside a 1700 SAT score, admission committees are probably not going to be impressed.

So, the SAT is a really big deal. How and when does the student start preparing for it? He should take a couple of SAT I practice tests at age twelve. Then, tailor the studies a bit based on the results. If his reading comprehension score is below 550, start buying reading comprehension books. If his math score is low, well I’m actually not sure what to do. It is very hard to catch up in math. That’s why it is extremely important to primarily focus on math up to this age. I guarantee if you follow this guide, you will be impressed with your student’s math SAT score. All three of my siblings and myself scored above 700 on this section (actually, we have a combined average score of 760, which is about two wrong on the whole math section).

The student should plan on taking the SAT I at age fifteen. This means start preparing at age fourteen. It may take up to a year of SAT preparation before the student is ready to ace the test. Don’t worry though. This studying is not useless once the test is over. Rather, it will just further hone his math, reading and writing skills.

Regarding the mechanics of studying for the SAT, make WRITTEN goals. Write out a timeline leading up to your test date and set goals along the way. Below is an example goal chart started six months before the test date. Take note how it is front-loaded (greater score increases early on) because it is harder to gain extra points as your score climbs.

Date Math Section Verbal Section Writing Section

01/01/2011 660 620 640

02/01/2011 700 660 680

03/01/2011 730 690 710

04/01/2011 750 710 730

05/01/2011 770 720 740

06/01/2011 790 730 750

06/03/2011 *Test Date

SAT Prep Books: Kaplan and Princeton’s SAT preparation books are solid. Also, CollegeBoard’s SAT guide is crucial. This book contains actual SAT I exams from past test dates and are perfect for measuring your progress. However, don’t take too many of these valuable tests too soon. Otherwise, the student will run out of official practice tests months before the test date.

Bottom Line: The student’s strong math and reading background will enable her to achieve a SAT I score in the 98th to 99th Percentile at age fifteen (two years before your peers will take the test). Set written goals and milestones for the SAT I dating at least four to six months before the test date. Buy the following SAT prep books:

• Most recent editions of Kaplan SAT Math, Verbal and Writing workbooks

• Most recent editions of Princeton Review SAT Math, Verbal and Writing workbooks

• Most recent edition of CollegeBoard’s SAT study guide

Insight #8: SAT IIs (required for most of the Ivies)

The SAT IIs are required for admission into most of the top colleges, especially for homeschool applicants. Again, these tests validate your student’s homeschool education. Most of the top schools require about three SAT IIs. There are close to a dozen different SAT II subject tests ranging from math and chemistry to foreign languages and history. Of course, pick the subject tests that are your student’s strengths. If you followed this guide, then her most favorable SAT II subject tests are probably Math (IC or IIC), Chemistry and Literature. Reading and math are her strengths, so the math and literature subject tests should be easy. Chemistry should also be easy. She will have taken two college chemistry classes before taking the chemistry subject test (to be discussed in Insight #9). Since the literature and math SAT IIs are similar to the verbal and math sections of the SAT I, she should probably take the SAT IIs within three months of taking the SAT I.

Bottom Line: The student should take the SAT IIs that will show her strengths. Unless your student was a history buff, or studied a foreign language, she will probably do best on the Math, Literature and Chemistry subject tests. By age sixteen, she should be armed with SAT I and SAT II scores that are well above 700 in each respective section.

Insight #9: College classes at age fourteen

No matter the college, one of the most daunting pre-medical “screener” classes is chemistry. I’ve seen hundreds of bushytailed pre-medical students have their medical professional dreams crushed in college chemistry. More often than not, these students take general chemistry for the first time while juggling other difficult classes such as general biology and calculus. Additionally, these students are still making the psychological adjustment from high school to college. No doubt they struggle in general chemistry! For homeschool students, it is incredibly easy to avoid this unforgiving situation. Your student should simply take general chemistry at a local college while still homeschooling (commonly called “dual enrollment”). Firstly, the student will have a smooth transition to the college atmosphere. Secondly, the student will only have one college class to focus on instead of four to five classes. Thirdly, he can re-take these classes for easy A’s at his Ivy League university.

Let me talk for a couple minutes about this last strategic step-re-taking classes. My family’s approach was to take the difficult pre-medical science classes (General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, General Biology and General Physics) at a local college that was only ranked “competitive” according to Barron’s Guide to Colleges. We called this college our “high school college.” Then, we would apply as freshman to higher-powered colleges, which we called our “real college.” In other words, our high school college served the same purpose as AP classes for public school students. We would then re-take these pre-medical science classes at our real college to achieve easy A’s. It is important to note that the grades at our high school college still count when applying to medical school. Medical schools factor every college class the applicant ever takes into his college GPA. Also, the grades from your student’s high school college will be sent to his real college when he applies. So, it is important to pick a high school college that isn’t too challenging. You want him to get A’s in these classes.

In addition to general chemistry, before enrolling in your real college, you should also take college biology, physics, organic chemistry and a writing class. (To save money on these classes, apply to your high school college to become a full time student. By age fifteen, you will already have stellar SAT scores and should get a scholarship.) By age sixteen to seventeen, your student will be ready to ace any pre-medical science class that Harvard or MIT has to offer.

Below is the following timeline of the classes I took:

Age (yrs) Semester Classes

14 Fall Introductory Chemistry

15 Winter General Chemistry I

15 Fall Organic Chemistry I

16 Winter General Chemistry II

16 Fall General Biology I, Freshman Writing Seminar

17 Winter General Physics II, General Biology II

Bottom Line: Starting at age fourteen, begin taking college classes. For the first year, until the SATs are completed, take one class a semester, preferably the general chemistries (so that you can take organic chemistry the next semester). Then, complete at least the first semester of the other pre-medical sciences and a writing class by age seventeen.

Insight #10: Applying to the Ivies

You will apply to the top school of your choice one year early and your application should look something like this:

• 2200 on SAT I

• 790 on SAT II Chemistry

• 740 on SAT II Math

• 720 on SAT II Literature

• 4.0 GPA in General Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I,

General Biology I and II, General Physics I

• Extracurriculars (following this guide, you should have plenty of time to play

sports, enter spelling bees, volunteer in the community, etc.)

Good Luck!